Monthly Archives: November 2014

Jesus of Nazareth

Jesus of Nazareth: Jew from Galilee, Savior of the World by Jens Schröter

Jesus of Nazareth: Jew from Galilee, Savior of the World by Jens Schröter

Jesus of Nazareth continues to fascinate. From antiquity onwards countless people have found meaning for their lives through Jesus’ teaching. His life led to the establishment of a community that subsequently grew into what is today the world’s largest religion. At the center of the Christian faith stands the confession that this Jesus is both “true human being and true God.”

In Jesus of Nazareth, noted German New Testament scholar Jens Schröter directly addresses the connection between Jesus’ humanity and divinity—how the historical Jesus can also be the Christ of confession. Schröter begins by looking at the modern quest for the “historical Jesus” from its beginnings down to the present. In the process Schröter isolates key questions of historical method—how can we reconstruct the past? What is the relationship between these reconstructions and past reality itself? Schröter then examines the words and deeds of Jesus, including his death and resurrection, in their Galilean and Greco-Roman contexts. Schröter finally measures the impact that Jesus has had in literature, film, music, and the fine arts. Jesus of Nazareth thus narrates the remarkable story of how a Jew from Galilee became the savior of the world, how Jesus can be said to be both God and human, and how this Jesus continues to exert influence.

To view this title, visit its page on Project MUSE.

The Power of Children

The Power of Children: The Construction of Christian Families in the Greco-Roman World by Margaret Y. MacDonald

The Power of Children:
The Construction of Christian Families in the Greco-Roman World by Margaret Y. MacDonald

The Power of Children examines Christian teaching about children in the context of family life in the Roman world. Specifically, author Margaret Y. MacDonald measures the impact of the New Testament’s household codes (Colossians 3:18–4:1; Ephesians 5:21–6:9; the Pastoral letters) for understanding the status and role of children in Christian homes and assemblies. By allowing children to frame her analysis, MacDonald demonstrates that the rigid social divisions of the period (wives–husbands, children–parents, slaves–masters) were far more complex and overlapping within the Christian context—highlighting the way in which Christian families challenged the prevailing imperial ideology. From curbing sexual abuse to the practice of pseudo-parenting and the teaching roles of both men and women in the family, MacDonald documents the development of an early Christian perspective that valued children as members in the household of God.

To view this title, visit its page on Project MUSE.